DIY Recipe: Lemon-Garlic Cannabis-Infused Glaze for Barbecue

Summer weekends are made for grilling out with friends and family. Picture it: Drinks are being poured, chatter and laughter are the soundtrack, the sunset is Insta-worthy and there’s something tasty on the barbecue. It doesn’t get much better. Or does it? We’re willing to bet that the addition of this lemon-garlic cannabis-infused glaze to your dinner fare levels up your event in no time.

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK & INSTAGRAM

First things first: Glaze, don’t marinate

Because this recipe calls for a cannabis tincture, we recommend using it as a glaze instead of a marinade. When using a marinade, you infuse your meat or vegetables before cooking. But if you cook a cannabis tincture at too high a temperature, it could potentially fry the cannabinoids so that they no longer carry the benefits you’re after. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), for example, loses its potency if heated too much.

For the best taste, be sure to use fresh ingredients, rather than concentrated juice or dried herbs and spices. That said, you can modify the herbs and seasonings to your liking. For example, if you enjoy a spicy glaze, add red pepper flakes or fresh chopped jalapeño to give it some heat.

RELATED: DIY RECIPE: CANNABIS-INFUSED MARINADE FOR 4TH OF JULY

Here are some more benefits, tips and tricks to cooking with this cannabis-infused glaze successfully:

  • Adding a precise amount of marijuana oil is a cinch because of the measuring lines on the dropper.
  • If you’re grilling for young guests or those sensitive to cannabis, you can portion the recipe into infused and non-infused portions. Be sure to separate and label each portion of glaze clearly, as the addition of lemon and garlic will mask any cannabis taste.
  • If you have a low tolerance for cannabis, you can decrease the amount of tincture you use. You can also choose to use a tincture with a cannabidiol (CBD) to THC ratio of 1:1 or even a tincture with a 20:1 CBD to THC ratio.
  • Be sure to check the label of your favorite tincture carefully, as the number of milligrams of THC in each tincture will vary anywhere from 100 to 500. The more the milligrams, the larger the amount of THC in each bite.
  • Another thing to keep in mind is that because this cannabis-infused glaze is an edible, you may not notice any effects from the cannabis for up to two hours. Have a small portion or glazed meat or veggies first, then wait for a while to see how it makes you feel before eating more.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 1/2 cup lemon juice (for best taste, use fresh lemons)
  • 1 tbsp liquid aminos*
  • 1 tbsp black pepper, freshly ground
  • 1/4 cup garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 tsp cilantro, finely chopped**
  • 15 mL of your favorite cannabis tincture

Method

  1. In a medium-sized bowl, combine the olive oil and lemon juice, and mix well with a whisk or fork.
  2. Add the liquid aminos to the oil and lemon mixture, then stir until blended. The liquid aminos will darken the color of the glaze.
  3. Sprinkle in the pepper and mix thoroughly.
  4. Add garlic to the mixture and stir well.
  5. Stir in the cilantro, which will add a strong, earthy fragrance when added to the garlic-lemon mixture.
  6. Use a small, clean spoon to taste your glaze and adjust the seasoning to your liking. This is also a good time to separate your infused and non-infused marinade.
  7. Mix in your cannabis tincture. Use the dropper in the tincture bottle to accurately measure out the amount of tincture needed. Most full droppers can hold one milliliter of oil, so you’ll need to add 15 droppers (or less, if desired). Blend well using a whisk.
  8. Once you’ve added the cannabis tincture, take another taste of your glaze to see if it needs the seasoning needs further adjusting. You can also add more olive oil to reduce acidity or add more lemon juice to increase acidity.
  9. Cover the mixture and place in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes, or until ready to use.
  10. After grilling your favorite meat or veggies, pull out your glaze and use a basting brush to spread on your food. If you don’t have a brush available, you can use the sprigs of the leftover cilantro as a makeshift brush.

*Don’t have liquid aminos? You can substitute reduced-sodium soy sauce.

**Hate cilantro? There may be a genetic reason why. If you think cilantro tastes like soap, switch it out for a milder herb like parsley or dill.

Photo credit: Evan Wise

If you’re new to cannabis and want to learn more, take a look at our Cannabis 101 index of articles. And if you have questions about cannabis, ask them and our community will answer.

The perfect dose of cannabis advice right to your inbox

Sign-up for news, deals, and more!
By signing up for Perfect Dose, you agree to our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.